No Shame No Blame Hats

Talking About Money, Part 5

One of the most important things you’ll need to remember about money involves a hat. It’s the No Shame, No Blame hat, and you’ll need to wear it during your personal money conversations, and you’ll need to encourage your clients to wear it during there’s. Because as experience and research…

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Talking About Money, Part 4

When we talk with clients about money, we need to find ways to remove ego from the discussion. One of my favorite tools is the Overnight Test. It gives people permission to back away from earlier investing decisions and make much-needed course corrections. It’s also a great way for dealing the emotions we’ve invested in some of our financial decisions.

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Talking About Money, Part 3

How do you have good, healthy conversations around money? In today’s episode, I’ll cover the conversations we have as advisors with clients and the conversations we have about our own finances. As real financial advisors, the things we learn, both in our work and with our own finances, creates a valuable feedback loop we can learn from.

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The Disappointing Reality of Meaningless Titles

I fear the clever marketing in the traditional financial services industry continues to confuse many people. They see the title “financial adviser,” “financial planner” or “financial” anything and expect to receive unbiased advice. This concern makes me think of the sketch above, which I shared many years ago in a…

alignment

Talking About Money, Part 2

At the core of helping people make good decisions with money is helping people get clear about their values and goals. I realize that no one comes in your office asking for that kind of help. In this episode, I’ll walk through why it’s so important to make sure this kind of conversation happens with your clients.

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Talking About Money, Part 1

In many countries and cultures, we’ve been taught to NOT talk about money. But it’s so important that we break that taboo because failing to talk about money means we often fail to align our use of capital with what we say is most important to us. This is part one in my series, Talking About Money.

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Personal Customs Gate: Stop Stuff From Coming Into the House

My wife and I are setting up a customs screening station in our driveway. No, we’re not starting an international airport. And it’s not for solicitors, strangers or gift-bearing guests.

It’s for us and our stuff.

From now on, before anything new comes into the house, resident buyers will need to answer a series of questions. How much did it cost? Are you replacing something you already own? Why do you think it’s amazing? And if it’s food, are you sure you’ll eat it?

We’re doing this because stuff is taking over our home. And right now we’re in the process of getting rid of things we never use. We’re organizing, sorting and throwing things out from one end of the house to the other. And it feels. So. Good.

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Talking About Money

Financial advisors are used to talking about money, but with other people. Even the “experts” can struggle to talk about money in their personal lives. I know. I’m speaking from experience. I love having these great conversations with clients, but when I go to talk about money with my wife or kids, it becomes less easy. This episode marks the start of a new series focused on how to talk about money.

Noise Info Wisdom

Detoxing Your Clients from Financial Pornography

When I first start working with clients, there’s a period of time I refer to as the financial pornography detox. It’s when you’ll get calls from clients wanting to know what they should do based on what some talking head said or some headline they read. Your job as a real financial advisor is to help them detox from this nonsense and understand they don’t need to do pay any attention to this so-called investment news.

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Your Market Viewpoint: 5 Days or 5 Years

Early Friday morning, a friend texted me. Here’s what he said: “Will you come talk to my co-workers?! They are talking about stopping their 401(k) contributions because of what’s going on! Driving me nuts!”

Still not quite awake, I replied, “What?”

Within seconds, he replied, “Stock market fell 500 points this morning, Carl! It’s all the way down to 17,537!”

My first thought: “Wow! The Dow is over 17,000.” And this is where things got a bit exciting for me as a financial professional.